The Impact of Collective Bargaining Legislation on Charter Schools in Hawai’i: One State’s Story

The Impact of Collective Bargaining Legislation on Charter Schools in Hawai’i- One State’s StoryThe Impact of Collective Bargaining Legislation on Charter Schools in Hawai’i:

One State’s Story

Robert A. Fox Nina K. Buchanan

For the past several decades, states have been continually adjusting education statutes in an effort to respond to growing public dissatisfaction with public education. The phenomenon of charter schools has, in the last decade, emerged as one response in at least 40 states. Labor unions in American education have been, for a number of years, undergoing a transition from ‘outsider’ to members of the education establishment (American School Board Journal, 1983; Clark, 2001; Geisert, 1984; Haar, 1996,1999; Kirkpatrick, 2000; Strom & Baxter, 2001) and, in those states which permit public sector collective bargaining, teachers unions have in many cases emerged as vocal adversaries to the establishment of charter schools (Cox, 2003, September 17; Klein, 2003, October 26; Maranto, 2003, Winter; RPP International, 1997; School Reform News, 1997, January: Slater, 2002, January 7; Union’s cynical power play, 2004, January 7). These states have, perforce, attempted the delicate balancing act between charter school flexibility/autonomy and public employee protection/unionization but with mixed success

The Impact of Collective Bargaining Legislation on Charter Schools in Hawai’i:

One State’s Story

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