Persuasion in school-aged children: How does it change if the persuadee is the mother or the peer?

Persuasion in school-aged children: How does it change if the persuadee is the mother or the peer?

Abstract
The present study was designed to verify how school-aged children’s persuasive tactics changed if the persuadee was the mother or the peer. One hundred and forty-nine children at two grade levels (4th and 5th) were enrolled in the study. Persuasive strategies were investigated using pictures representing two common situations in which each child had to convince his/her playmate and his/her mother to obtain a toy. As predicted, with mothers children engaged more frequently in strategies aimed at encouraging cognitive reappraisal of the situation and offering guarantees. Conversely, with the peers, children adopted a greater variety of persuasive strategies, engaging in lower-order tactics. Implications and limitations of the study were discussed.
persuasion in school

Persuasion in school-aged children: How does it change if the persuadee is the mother or the peer?

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