EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND NEGOTIATION: THE TENSION BETWEENCREATING AND CLAIMING VALUE

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND NEGOTIATION: THE TENSION BETWEENCREATING AND CLAIMING VALUE

Maw Der Foo

National University of Singapore

Hillary Anger Elfenbein

University of California,

Berkeley Hwee Hoon Tan

National University of Singapore

Voon Chuan Aik

National University of Singapore

Emotional Intelligence

This study examines how the emotional intelligence of each individual—as well as the emotional intelligence of the individual’s interaction partner—leads to outcomes in negotiation. This contrasts with the majority of studies on EI that centre on unidirectional influence, for example illustrating how individuals high in EI have positive relations with others (Lopes, Salovey, & Straus, 2003) and are more likely to be elected as leaders (Wolff, Pescosolido, & Druskat, 2002).

Emotional intelligence (EI) has been found to influence workplace outcomes. For example, Law et al. (2004), found that employee self-report of emotional intelligence is positively related to supervisor evaluations of job dedication, interpersonal facilitation and task performance. This concept has generated a great deal of excitement both inside and outside of academia (Law et al., 2004), and was most widely popularized by Goleman’s (1995) best-selling book, providing an integrative summary of decades of research in related areas. In spite of its popularization, at its core the emotional intelligence literature draws from rigorous psychological research concerning intelligence and social skills (e.g., Law et al., 2004; Matthews, Zeidner, & Roberts, 2002; Rosenthal, Hall, DiMatteo, Rogers, & Archer, 1979; Thorndike, 1966).

success-ei
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND NEGOTIATION: THE TENSION BETWEENCREATING AND CLAIMING VALUE

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